Finding Centres in Europe

Some helpful Cancer contact sites

 

United Nations World Health Organisation logo

United Nations World Health Organisation logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

These are some sites that provide helpful information when you are Googling to find somewhere for treatment.

 

Listing these sites does not constitute any kind of recommendation.

 

But readers will find a huge amount of information listing contacts at various centres abroad.

 

Most of the sites are written in English, or have a translation button to click on.

 

Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI)

 

http://www.oeci.eu/

 

Under ‘Membership’ on the OECI website, there is a geographical breakdown:  e.g. 11 members are listed for France.

 

The Cancer Index website

 

http://www.cancerindex.org/clinks5f.htm

 

has a list of 22 French cancer resources here

 

Canceractive website

 

http://www.canceractive.com/cancer-active-page-link.aspx?n=435&Title=Centres%20of%20Excellence
Five ‘top’ cancer treatment centres are listed here;  one is the Institut Gustave Roussey in French, which treats many, many top politicians and VIPs from other countries.

Europa Donna

www.europadonna.org

EUROPA DONNA (ED), the European Breast Cancer Coalition, is an independent non-profit organisation whose members representing 46 countries are affiliated groups from countries throughout Europe.   The Coalition works to raise awareness of breast cancer and to mobilise the support of European women in pressing for improved breast cancer education, appropriate screening, optimal treatment and increased funding for research. ED represents the interests of European women regarding breast cancer to local and national authorities as well as to institutions of the EU.  Currently they are engaged in forming a list of recognised breast cancer treatment centres throughout Europe.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer

 

http://www.iarc.fr/

 

IARC is part of the World Health Organization, and provides an international perception.  They have a page dedicated to a series of ‘useful links’ on cancer organisations.  This is principally of interest to doctors and nurses working in oncology – but if you are an  ‘informed patient’ you might find just the data you are looking for!

 

IARC’s mission is to coordinate and conduct research on the causes of human cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis, and to develop scientific strategies for cancer prevention and control. The Agency is involved in both epidemiological and laboratory research and disseminates scientific information through publications, meetings, courses, and fellowships.

 

They issue very useful and interesting monthly News alerts.  This is an extract from one such alert:

 

1.  IARC Scientific Publication No 163 – Molecular Epidemiology: Principles and Practices
01/04/2012 –
Molecular Epidemiology: Principles and Practices
IARC Scientific Publication No 163
Edited by Nathaniel Rothman, Pierre Hainaut, Paul Schulte, Martyn Smith, Paolo Boffetta and Frederica Perera.  This book captures the fascinating developments and provides an extended, forward-looking vision of the principles, practice and impact of Molecular Epidemiology. Written and coordinated by world leaders in the field, the book covers, in a systematic way, the major conceptual advances, with a strong emphasis on study design and on how to incorporate biomarker studies into epidemiology practice.  Read more , Order at WHO Press

 

2.  We are pleased to announce the publication of a list of carcinogenic agents – by cancer site – with sufficient or limited evidence in humans. The list will be updated regularly as new classifications are announced.

 

See List of Classifications by Cancer Site , IARC Monographs website
IARC Latin America Collaboration

 

3.  The directors of national cancer institutions from 15 Latin American countries met in Lyon in March 2012 under the initiative of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), to discuss the current status of research on cancer prevention and control in the region.

 

4.  The Lancet – Cancer mortality in India: a nationally representative survey
This landmark study, as well as providing a unique snapshot of the current Indian situation with respect to cancer mortality, paves the way for other emerging economies to implement similar systems in settings where the civil death registration systems (CRS) are either non-existent or too weak to provide reliable information on the numbers and causes of deaths.

 

Cancer mortality in India: a nationally representative survey.
R Dikshit, P C Gupta, C Ramasundarahettige, V Gajalakshmi, L Aleksandrowicz, R Badwe, R Kumar, S Roy, W Suraweera, F Bray, M Mallath, P K Singh, D N Sinha, A S Shet, H Gelband, P Jha, for the Million Death Study Collaborators
The Lancet, Early Online Publication, 28 March 2012 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60358-4

 

5.  El Espectador – Una vez más la salud en crisis
Interview of Dr Chris Wild for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador: Health in crisis, once again.
Read more (available only in Spanish) , Website El Espectador

 

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